Category: 17) Creating A Center For Communication Design


Chapter Summary

This chapter examines the process of developing pedagogical and administrative approaches for a newly created Center for Multimedia Communication Design (CMCD). Jennifer Sheppard argues that new media scholars can benefit from attention to the concepts of situated practice and communities of practice as a theoretical and practical approach to building learning spaces devoted to new media work. Both concepts relate the process of learning to the importance of immersive activity done in collaboration with others and support the idea that expertise develops through opportunities for authentic practice over time.

Jennifer Sheppard

jennifersheppard

Sheppard

Jennifer Sheppard is an assistant professor at New Mexico State University. She received her PhD in rhetoric and technical communication from Michigan Technological University. Her primary areas of interest are digital communication, multimedia design, and workplace literacy. In addition to being a professor, she is also the web designer and coordinator for NMSU Department of English and the digital video producer for Doña Ana County Emergency Medical Responders. She is also an editorial board member for Kairos. nnifer Sheppard is an assistant professor at New Mexico State University. She received her PhD in rhetoric and technical communication from Michigan Technological University. Her primary areas of interest are digital communication, multimedia design, and workplace literacy. In addition to being a professor, she is also the web designer and coordinator for NMSU Department of English and the digital video producer for Doña Ana County Emergency Medical Responders. She is also an editorial board member for Kairos.

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